A Great Multitasker

Lily M

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It’s 6:02 am, good morning! It’s the first day of junior year! While this may not strike you as excited, this is the first day you get to drive yourself to school. You’ve spent the last 6 months with your parents sitting next to you, even though you are practically a pro. But, they have taught you a lot. They even taught you how to multitask when you drive. You’ve always seen your mom eating her breakfast while driving you to school. You always noticed your dad speeding when you were running late. You drive with your friends all the time, and they are constantly responding to Snapchat’s while driving, they don’t even need to look at the road! You’ve practically memorized where every road sign, traffic light, and speed limit is posted on the way to school. So even if you do need to look away from the road, you’ll know where everything is. You think to yourself, “How hard could it be?” It’s 6:34 am, you finally step foot into the driver’s seat of your car, no longer having to wait for your parents to get in next to you. You’ve made yourself a coffee, considering the fact that the earliest you’ve woken up all summer is 11 (yes, the earliest). Even if you choose to drink coffee while you drive, it’s okay because you’re a great multitasker. It’s 6:42 am, you can still feel yourself falling asleep. You even start noticing yourself veering off the road a little bit. Of course, you are going to turn the music up a little louder than usual to wake yourself up more. You pick your phone up to turn the volume up, just to find a text from your mom telling you to have a great first day. It’s your mom, you have to respond. You figure you’ll just respond with a “Thanks.” If you think about it, you’ve already taken your eyes off the road AND your hands. So, 6 words wouldn’t hurt, right? Of course not, because you’re a great multitasker. It’s now 6:57 am, you’re stuck in traffic, already driving slow. Do you hear your phone ringing? It’s your friends wondering where you are. You don’t pick up, but decide it’s okay to text back, right? I mean, you’ve already driven way faster than you should, turned your music up louder than usual, taken your hands off the wheel one too many times, but it’s okay because again, you’re a great multitasker. At this point, the first bell is about to ring. Are you really gonna be that person late to school on the first day? Of course not. You come up to a red light, recklessly thinking to yourself, “I can definitely make it.” I mean you’ve already accomplished so much on this drive, what’s running one red light gonna do? You’re about to until something stops you. You slam on your brakes. You turn off the radio. You power off your phone. You take a second to realize every decision you’ve made. The danger you put yourself in, as well as the human beings around you. You were about to risk your own safety, for what? A late pass on the first day of school? It wouldn’t have been worth it, because you made it to school with 3 minutes to spare. You drive home from school with absolutely every distraction off. You make a promise to yourself that you will never be that person again, under any circumstances.


Description

This writing piece is about a teen who has just gotten permission to drive themselves to school, and it just so happens to be the first day. Throughout this piece, you see the common distractions they face while driving and continuously becomes more and more dangerous. It is meant to show how every decision you make on the road matters and how you can be influenced by seeing what others do on the road in a positive or negative way. You will see the outcome of every decision this driver makes and how at an instant, one bad decision could be life-changing.