A simple word

Roan T

0

Distraction. Just a simple word can conjure up many thoughts. Maybe you think about daydreaming during class. Possibly you consider yourself in the zone, working when a sharp noise throws you off. Another possibility? The number one killer of teens nationwide. No one ever thinks they’ll be part of that statistic until all the risk factors add up, your car swerves off the road, and there’s a split second where you realize you may actually become the statistic. In that split second, you consider, “how did I get here?” Was it the time of day, late at night after a party? Was it the rain which rarely ever manifests itself where you live? Or possibly it was the music you asked the driver to pump up as you loudly spoke with your friend riding shotgun. All of you are tired; that’s a possibility too. You consider, panicked, “what could have stopped my impending death?” Could you have kept your seatbelt on, your phone off? Could you have stayed quiet until the conditions outside improved, until you all arrived back home? It’s too late now; the split second is over. The driver hits the brakes, desperately, but that doesn’t stop the collision from occurring. It’s too late to reverse your decisions. Now you wonder how your parents will feel, how your friends in the front seat will feel when they find out your actions, and their actions, have increased your likelihood of a collision by 1382%. Are your friends in the front seat even alive? A few simple steps, as you considered in that split second, could have stopped all of this from happening. You’re not the driver, but you’re equally as responsible for this as they are. You could have told them to keep their phone in their bag, you could have made sure they had an adequate amount of energy to stay awake. You could have stopped talking with your friend up front. There are just so many ‘coulds’. Unfortunately, there are no redos when it comes to distraction.


Description

An examination of the many ‘coulds’ that lead up to a car accident.