What Statistics are Made Of

Clara K

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In 2015, a presumed 3,477 people were killed in accidents relating to the phenomenon of texting and driving. Doesn’t do much, does it? That big number. You’ve probably seen or heard it before, on a billboard, online, on an ad on the radio. One learns to drown out death, or at least numbers, pretty quickly. You don’t consider that at night when it’s cold outside and the car‘s heater is rattling away, doing it‘s best to heat up the still air, when you think only your own two headlights are cutting through the dense fog and you want nothing but the warm glow of your phone‘s screen as a friend sends you a message- a hello, a meme, a smart remark- anything to make you feel less alone. However, you, me, all of us are what statistics are made of. Each of us could be a tragic story in the making. Hopefully not, since that would be a dreary and pessimistic way of seeing the world, but why is it that we never think the bad things could potentially happen to ourselves, our best friends, our classmates, our lab partners, that kid that always says hi to you in the halls. For shame, really. There’s so many better statistics one could be a part of. One could be one of the many people to land a dream job, to find a fascinating hobby, to travel to a new place, to make friends, to make something of your short existence on this ball of earth hurtling through space. So be careful, keep your life- and that of others- safe. If you must become a statistic, a number on paper, then let it be one of the good ones. You can write your friend later.


Description

In 2015, about 3,477 deaths were presumably caused by texting and driving. What does that even really mean? Why does one never think that one could be affected by this fact? Unfortunately, we are what statistics are made of. If one must become a number on paper, then may it at least be one of the good ones.