So sorry

Jessica K

0

They say it comes when you least expect it – Friendship, love, opportunities. Death. It was just a regular day. I was driving my sister and I to school, a coffee in one hand and a donut in the other, my pinkie wrapped around the wheel to keep the car straight. My 2006 blue beauty had a few dings and scratches, but for the most part my loyal companion – named Andrew – had seen no danger more than a catfight between my sister and her ex friend in the backseat. Sure, at first I had been a tentative driver, but as time went on I realized driving really wasn’t that hard, and nothing bad would happen if I talked, or sang with the radio, or ate, or even texted. It had been two years since I got my license, and if anyone was a pro, it was me. My sister was talking to me about some drama between her and her homecoming date and her jealous friend, while I was busy thinking about how great my own homecoming was going to be. The big dance was only a few days away anyways, and today was the pep rally where homecoming queen was going to be decided. In fact, if we didn’t hurry, we might miss the pep rally! I stepped on the gas, realizing we only had a few minutes to get there on time, still munching my donut. Setting my coffee down, I grabbed my phone and sent a quick text to my friend asking her to save us seats. BANG. All it took was a second, one second of tires screeching and smoking, one second-long bang, one absolute terror-filled second, before everything went black. If I could change anything at all in my life, it wouldn’t be my crooked nose, or my crappy part-time job, or my monotone calculus teacher. No, I would give everything, anything, for me to have listened when someone told me not to drive distracted. Because while I may have lost my license and my car, I also lost my sister. Apparently while the paramedics were dragging my bruised and broken body out of the car, and my sister’s cold and lifeless one, the pep rally went on, unaware of the slaughter just a mile away. The homecoming queen was unanimously chosen, no objections or hesitation. Grace, my sister. She could have been a queen. Just three days from having the best, the happiest day of her life, and I, her own sister, stole it from her. Looking back, I would give anything for it to have been me. If I had been one bit less overconfident, one bit less foolish. If I would have been focused on the road, my sister could be here to help me feel better again, to scare away the nightmares of her dying right next to me. I would give anything even just to say goodbye, and to tell her I’m sorry. So, so, sorry.


Description

Prose story of a teenager whose overconfidence kills, and the powerful regret she feels for her distracted driving.