Create Real Impact Contest

Reckless and Distracted Driving is the #1 Killer of Teens in America

graphic about teen art contest about distracted driving

The Create Real Impact Contest gives you the opportunity to share creative solutions for preventing reckless and distracted driving while winning prizes for your efforts.

graphic about teen creative contest in photo video art and writing

Grand prizes in each category!
Awards for top vote-getters & schools with the most participation.

SPRING 2019 CONTEST DATES:

Contest Opens: 1/4/19 9:01 PM PDT
Contest Closes: 3/27/19 9:00 PM PDT
Online Voting Opens: 3/28/19 12:01 AM PDT
Online Voting Closes: 4/5/19 8:59 PM PDT

 


 

Congratulations to the Spring 2019 Contest Winners:

Grand Prize for Music

So Much to Live For

Everen G

Grand Prize for Writing

Be Different

Ashlee W

Everyone else does it. You think, why can’t you? Your entire childhood your parents would pile a few more kids than the car could fit on the way home from soccer practice. It was no big deal. Your dad said it was okay if you sat on someones lap and didn’t wear a seat belt, he said you’d be fine. You remember on the way to school in the morning your mom would speed if you were running late. She said it was fine. Your dad always answered if work would call while he was driving. You thought that you weren’t supposed to go on your phone while you drove, but dad did it so it must be fine. On the way to a fancy dinner mom would look in the mirror to put on lipstick. She only looked away from the road for a few seconds so she said it was fine. Dad sometimes didn’t put on his seatbelt. When you asked why, he said he was a good driver so it was fine. Mom would sometimes answer her texts while driving, but she said she only did it at stop lights so it was fine. On long family road trips where you’d be driving home all night you noticed Dad yawning as he swerved a little. You asked if he was tired and wanted to stop, but he said he just wanted to get home so it was fine. Mom would always change the radio station while she was driving, but she said she was a good multi-tasker. You figured it was fine. Dad often ate while he was driving. He said it was harmless, he said it was fine. Mom would turn the music all the way up when one of her favorite songs would come on. That one time she didn’t even hear when an ambulance came flying by, but she said it was fine. Parents are the number one influencer of teens driving attitudes and behaviors. Just because mom or dad did it, does not make it fine. Don’t participate in distracted driving or bad driving habits. Don’t hurt you or someone else, it’s not fair and it’s certainly not worth it. Stand up and say it’s not fine. Make a change; be different.

Top Online Vote Getter for Writing

Wrecking Irresponsible Driving: Roadney Rides Along

Karla C

BEEP. BEEP. BEEP. At the sound of the alarm, Roadney, the small, chubby, red Wreckbuster put on her super suit and poked her head out the muffler. She put on her super sticky gloves and climbed her way to the open window, from which she saw the young girl whose reckless and distracted driving triggered the alarm. Roadney saw that, despite knowing that she had friends on board, the teenage driver sporadically drove left handed to take a bite from her burger and take a sip from her soda. She also held her phone and replied to text messages whenever a stop sign, a red light, or a slow driver ahead seemed to give a chance. During one of those apparent chances to get her hands off the driving wheel, she connected her phone to her radio and played music at the highest volume possible; it could be heard from blocks away. The situation was the definition of a code red for the Wreckbuster. This wasn’t the first time this driver chose to be reckless. For months the Wreckbuster had prevented the driver’s demise by eating her food, drinking her sodas, turning off her phone, and causing malfunctions in the radio’s audio without the driver knowing. She did this day after day, but performing these actions seemed pointless and repetitive. This time, Roadney tried a new solution. She climbed to the top of the window and jumped inside the car, landing on the armrest. She ran towards the dashboard, ensuring to hang on to the door as the driver sped up above 70 miles per hour simply for the fun of it. When Roadney reached the end of the door, she climbed the dashboard and ran across it, until she stood right above the radio. Using her most recent technology, the Wreckbuster took out her image creator and set it up at the dashboard. She projected images of the same road the driver was seeing, except that every several miles, there was a projection of a real-looking hologram of billboards showing fictional figures crashing due to distracted driving. These holograms appeared repeatedly until the driver was startled. She began to feel as if the billboards were showing up just for her. By the look of her face, Roadney could tell that the girl was growing aware of the dangers of her actions, both for her and for her friends. The driver slowly began to let go of her phone. She stopped taking bites at her meal. She turned the volume down and focused her eyes on the road for the remainder of the drive. Roadney smiled. She knew she had found the perfect solution: the drivers themselves. No one can stop reckless driving except for the person behind the wheel. There was a reason the Wreckbuster was invisible. She was there to raise awareness of the issue, not to stop it herself. You. You are the solution to reckless driving. Unlike the Wreckbuster, you are not a product of my imagination. You can raise awareness about distracted driving and its impact. Tell your friends to drive responsibly, and practice responsible driving yourself.

Top Online Vote Getter for Art

Just Put it Away

Camila G

Runner Up for Video

Simple Solution to Save a Life

Eli B

Runner Up for Video

Invisiphone Commercial

Caleb B

Honorable Mention for Writing

Mom, I'm Sorry.

Hennessy M

My mom always told me, “You’re a new driver, you cannot be driving at night”. However, I drove that night. My mom always told me, “You’re a new driver, you cannot be driving with the radio so loud”. However, I drove with the radio blasting that night. My mom always told me, “You’re a new driver, you cannot be driving with your friends in the car.” However, I drove with all my friends in the car that night. My mom always told me, “You’re a new driver, you cannot be on your phone”. However, I drove with my phone on my lap, checking every message that I received that night. My mom always told me, “You’re a new driver, you cannot be distracted”. However, I drove, distracted by everything that night. My mom told me before I left that house that morning, “Come back early, be safe. I love you”. I didn’t listen. I didn’t listen when I saw the sun setting and didn’t drive back home to you. I didn’t listen when I turned the volume up on the radio. I didn’t listen when I offered all my friends a ride. I didn’t listen when I kept glancing down on my phone. I didn’t listen when I was focused on everything around me but driving. Mom, you were right. I could have been home early. I could have just turned the radio off. I could have said no to my friends. I could have put my phone away. I could have been a safe driver. I could have followed your advice. I could have prevented the crash. I could have made it home safely. I could have been with you tonight. Mom, I’m sorry.

School Winners for School

Village Academy of Film & Technology

School Winners for School

South Forsyth High School

Grand Prize for Video

Listen Up

Caden T

Grand Prize for Art

Camera Filters

Lindsey S

Top Online Vote Getter for Video

Is the Guilt Worth the Distraction?

Danielle M

Top Online Vote Getter for Music

Safe Driving Is Our Mode

Rylee E

Runner Up for Video

To Live or To Love?

Victoria P

Runner Up for Music

No Reply

Mica G

Runner Up for Art

Rolling the Dice

Jena T

Honorable Mention for Writing

I Am Your Phone

Jayme S

Hello! I am your phone. I sit in your pocket everyday and know all of your deepest secrets and happiest moments. I went with you when you took your permit test. I was there when you learned how to push the brake. I was there when your parents first took you on the interstate. I announced to your friends when you finally received your license. And I was in your hand when almost drove into that ditch. I don’t want to be responsible for your crash, so do me a favor. Please put me on do not disturb when you drive. Feel free to listen to music on me, but don’t text or call on me. That message from Samantha can wait until your hands aren’t on the wheel. Maybe we could do something else too. You don’t need to turn me off or leave me at home, but just think. I’m designed to last years, but I can’t be here for you if you’re not here for me. Place me in the passenger’s seat or give me to your passenger. I won’t let them see your secrets. I promise. I’m here for you, so please stick around to use me. I want to announce your wedding and your first child. I want to tell show people the pictures of you in Mexico or England. I want to connect you to Samantha when she’s upset. For my sake, do not use me while you drive.

School Winners for School

University City High School